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The head of Primorye promised to release all animals from the “whale prison” in the natural environment

Since the autumn of 2018 more than a hundred animals have been kept in the “prison”.


White whales in the aviary of the Center for the Adaptation of Marine Animals in the Bay of Sredny Primorsky Krai Photo: Vitaly Ankov, RIA Novosti

Oleg Kozhemyako, the governor of Primorye, said that the scientists had made a “principled decision” to release all animals from the “whale prison” in Nakhodka to the wild. About this reports RIA “News.”

According to Kozhemyaki, the decision was made on the results of the work of Russian scientists together with a group of experts from the French ocean researcher Jean-Michel Cousteau (the eldest son of the famous oceanographer Jacques-Yves Cousteau), who arrived in Russia in early April.

Since the autumn of 2018, there are more than one hundred (11 orcas and 90 belugas) animals in the “whale prison” in the bay near Nakhodka . They were caught by private companies from summer to autumn 2018. On October 24, 2018, Greenpeace found out that 13 killer whales from the “prison” want to sell to China. On November 16, 2018, the Primorsky Krai SC initiated a criminal case under the article on the illegal extraction of aquatic bioresources.

February 22, 2019, Putin ordered the Ministry of Natural Resources to solve the problem of whales before March 1. February 28 FSB started the administrative proceedings on the organizers of the “whale jail” in Primorye. The ministry added that, according to experts, animals must be released into their natural habitat.

In early March, Interfax reported that in addition to killer whales and beluga whales there are walruses in the bay. Andrei Nasonov, head coach of the adaptation center for marine mammals, refused to mention the number and age of walruses. According to the publication, there were six walruses in the bay. In support of animals, among others spoke Pamela Anderson, son of Jacques-Yves Cousteau and Leonardo DiCaprio.

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