social network

Twitter creator Jack Dorsey about childhood, the true goal of the social network and Mark Zuckerberg’s proposal to eat a goat

The main thing from the big interview with Rolling Stone.

Reuters Photos

Twitter founder Jack Dorsey gave a great interview to Rolling Stone magazine. In contrast to the standard conversations with IT-people of his level, in which often we are talking only about the created project, in this interview, 42-year-old Dorsey talks a lot about himself and his philosophy.

About the far right on Twitter

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]I used to tweet about Kendrick [Lamar], and people said, “Cool, but could you increase the price of the shares of [the company]?”. Then it turned into requirements to add a tweet edit button. Recently, the themes of abuse and our policies have become more pronounced. This also applies to people’s attitudes towards the Nazis and their desire to remove them [from Twitter]. People are definitely not satisfied with our work in this direction. This is not as simple as it seems, but it needs to be done.[/perfectpullquote]

About Twitter as a public park metaphor

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]If someone in the square stands on an improvised platform with a megaphone and starts screaming, a crowd gathers around and listens. This person can also shout to the whole park: “Hey, idiot, yes, I’m talking to you, come here.” Then this is really offensive behavior and people see it, they say: “Hey man, don’t do that. Stop it. And then there is the police of the park, which maintains standards of decency.[/perfectpullquote]

On the need to deal with misleading information

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]We decide to focus on combating misleading information, the purpose of which is to lead someone in a certain direction in order to [trigger the desire] to take certain actions. […][/perfectpullquote] [perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]I do not think that we should just say: “The social network will take care of itself”. We need to ask the question: “How can we not determine where the truth is, and where is the lie, but how to determine which information is misleading?”. And how should we stop the spread of such information before it leads to a significant impact?[/perfectpullquote]

About people’s addiction to Twitter

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]There is a general dependence, even without Twitter, on new events and news. News addicts do exist, as do those who chase headlines and hot photos, or distribute hot photos. […][/perfectpullquote] [perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]But we never developed a product with the thought “How do we make it so that it causes addiction?”. I never asked such a question and never heard that my team asked such a question.[/perfectpullquote]

About plans to remove the “like” counter from Twitter

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]We really think what will happen if we remove the like button. When people today open Twitter, what stimulates them? I do not know the answer. We are asking this question right now. The question is, if we take the counter [“like”] from everyone except the author? What will be the result?[/perfectpullquote]

About wanting to make Twitter a useful learning tool

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]I ask people: “By the time you get out of Twitter, did you learn something new?” Most say no or answer that they already knew this or that information. I want every Twitter user to not spend hours, days or minutes to consume content, but instead get notified when there is some potentially interesting information that he could find out, or, ideally, in which I would like to participate .[/perfectpullquote] [perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]For me, this practice would be akin to something useful. I would leave Twitter and feel more confident, informed and happy. But now I feel overwhelmed, because, after all, I don’t know anything new.[/perfectpullquote]

About the trip to Myanmar

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]The first amazing thing I learned is that the Internet is associated with Facebook there. Twitter is weakly active, if at all active. The second remarkable thing is that each monk and nun has phones with her. I spoke with many monks who are sure that all the information from the phone and Facebook is true. But I went there for meditation. Next year I will go again, and later too. I really intend to communicate more with people about what is happening [in Myanmar] and find out how I can help. Somewhere you need to start. I sincerely care about the fate of this country.[/perfectpullquote]

On problems with speech in childhood

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]Yes, I had speech defects. I could not utter a word. Became shy. I did not want to talk to anyone, even with my relatives. […][/perfectpullquote] [perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]In high school, I was mortally afraid to talk, but then I realized that it was just nonsense, and I needed to fix it. I joined the speech team. They had such a contest for improving speech, when they give you a white card, and you have five minutes to write a speech on it. It was the worst thing I ever did. [But] I just continued and continued to do it. It helped.[/perfectpullquote]

About the little joys of creating Twitter

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]I wrote a line of code that made Biza’s phone (one of the founders of Twitter — approx. )vibrate. It could be felt. That’s what my pleasure was for the first two weeks [of creating Twitter]. I programmed something that made an object move. I tweeted something and Biz’s pocket vibrated. And he was starting to think about me. […][/perfectpullquote] [perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]That’s when I really got hooked on the balance between tangibility and the world of programming.[/perfectpullquote]

About the dream of becoming the mayor of New York

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]I have always admired the city. I could not think of a better way to observe and influence the city than working as a mayor. At some point, I realized that I could make a plan [for the development of the city], but its effect will not be noticeable for the next eight years, whereas at the same time I can write a simulation and add program code to the model in eight seconds. Now I am becoming more and more convinced that construction and creation can influence [the world] faster than our legislative system works. Besides, I probably would have been a terrible mayor.[/perfectpullquote]

About charity

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]Well, I want to give everything away. One of the problems of the modern world is climate change. The other is economic inequality. It seems to me unfair to what [resources] I have access to. I founded the Start Small Foundation, the purpose of which is to teach people to build a business in places like Ferguson () and grow in business, because I consider business to be part of a reliable community. […][/perfectpullquote] [perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]I intend to help eliminate income inequality through my wealth.[/perfectpullquote]

About Ilona Mask

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]People like Ilona are pioneers. I do not know another person on Earth who would lead us away from the planet because of the damage we cause to her. […][/perfectpullquote] [perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]I have a friend a music producer. I asked him: “What brought you to the music?” He replied: “I never knew how to play. I don’t even know if my taste is good. I love musicians and just want to help them. ” I have similar feelings for Ilona. I understand what he wants, and I want to help. Such is the role of any tool maker. We create tools.[/perfectpullquote]

About Mark Zuckerberg’s offer to eat a goat for lunch

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]There was a year when he ate only what he killed (this is about Zuckerberg ’s personal challenge in 2011 – ). He cooked a goat for lunch. Killed a goat. He kills them with some kind of laser weapon, and then with a knife. Then sends to the butcher.[/perfectpullquote] [perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]Or rather, maybe not with a laser weapon, but with a stun gun. It stuns her, and he cuts her. And then it is sent to the butcher. In Palo Alto, there is a rule that you can have six livestock on a piece of land, so he had six goats.[/perfectpullquote] [perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””] Next, Dorsey describes the dinner scene: Dorsey – “Do we eat the goat that you killed?” Zuckerberg – “Yes.” Dorsey – “Have you eaten a goat before?” Zuckerberg – “Yes, I like it.” Dorsey – “What else do we have?” Zuckerberg – Salad. Dorsey – “Where’s the goat?” Zuckerberg – “She’s in the oven.” Then we waited for about 30 minutes, and he’s like this: “I think she’s ready.” We went down to the dining room, he got a goat. She was cold. It was unforgettable. I do not know if she returned to the oven afterwards. I only ate salad. [/perfectpullquote]

About Steve Jobs

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]My father was a technologist, and my mother was an artist. This balance cannot be found anywhere. He (Jobs – approx. ) was the only one who did something interesting in this context. And he was also an icon. He really knew who he was. He was confident, curious and just charming. It attracted me in the early years, during the Apple Macintosh.[/perfectpullquote] [perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]I remember this ad during the “Super Bowl.” It was something unlike anything else in the world, it’s all a confrontation of personality and creative thought against a system. It was so inspiring that I had to learn about him and his company. Unfortunately, two years later he was fired.[/perfectpullquote]

The famous Apple Macintosh ad, referring to the 1984 book by George Orwell

About the true goal of Twitter

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]I think Twitter has the potential to show the closest [version] of global consciousness available to us. The ability to intercept people’s thoughts. Feel what atmosphere is around everything that happens in the world. This is how I would like to use [Twitter]. For example, what do people think about what I just did? I believe that in this case the text is more important than the video or images. The text so quickly reaches the neurons. It is easy to consume quickly.[/perfectpullquote]

About no desire to become famous

[perfectpullquote align=”full” bordertop=”false” cite=”” link=”” color=”” class=”” size=””]I never wanted to become an entrepreneur. I never wanted to become CEO. I never wanted to become a public figure. I just had an idea, and I wanted it to work. That’s all. I became the CEO, because it was necessary. But that’s all. We earned money because we had to pay people salaries. It was more from necessity than from desire. I like to be behind the scenes. My favorite character in The Wizard of Oz is a wizard. Because he stayed behind the curtain.[/perfectpullquote]
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