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In the US, the court denied the atheists, the outraged phrase “We believe in God” in dollars

The Court considered that this practice does not contradict the Constitution.

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Getty Photos

In the US, the Minnesota Court of Appeals dismissed the complaint of 29 atheists, atheist children and atheist groups who claimed that the slogan “We believe in God” on American money contradicted the First Amendment to the Constitution on freedom of speech and religion.

Judge Raymond Gruender stated that the Constitution allows the government to celebrate the “tradition of religious freedom”. According to him, the placement of the phrase “We believe in God” on money corresponds to the “early understanding of the first amendment to the Constitution” and does not force compliance with the requirements of faith.

The phrase “We Believe in God” began to appear on coins in 1864 during the Civil War in the United States, Reuters said. On bills it was added in the mid-1960s. In 1956, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed a law that made the phrase a national motto.

In 2006, an attorney from California also appealed to the court demanding that the inscription “We Believe in God” be removed from coins and bills. The court refused him, ruling that the inscription is a tribute to the historical tradition and has nothing to do with religious propaganda. In 2011, Congress supported a resolution confirming the status of the United States national motto of the phrase “In God We Trust”.

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