TECH

Swedes virusically implant microchips under their skin

Thousands of Swedish people have voluntarily implanted microchips into their bodies, which can function as contactless credit cards, keys and travel tickets.

Once the chip is under the skin, you no longer need to worry about losing a credit card, or carrying a heavy purse. However, for many people the idea of ​​implanting a microchip in their body seems more like an anti-utopia than an embodied dream.

Some argue that the reason for this recent trend is probably the high level of welfare in Sweden. But in fact, the factors explaining why about 3,500 Swedes made a choice in favor of such microchips are more difficult than one would expect.

This phenomenon reflects the unique situation with biohaching in Sweden. If you look at the problem deeper, the Swedish addiction to any digital gadgets goes much further than these microchips.

The term “biohackers” is used for amateur biologists who conduct experiments in the field of biomedicine, but do so outside traditional institutions such as universities, medical companies and other scientifically-controlled structures. Just like computer hackers crack other people’s servers, biohackers hack biological systems.

Biohakking is also a culture, and diverse, with a multitude of subgroups, each of which has its own range of interests, goals and even ideology. However, for all the diversity, there are two main groups: the branch-hackers and transhumanists.

The first category includes amateur biologists who create laboratory equipment from household utensils. They practice the so-called “lean science”, finding inexpensive solutions that are designed to improve the standard of living of people in developing countries.

However, in addition, they also carry out more frivolous experiments, such as gene modification of plants to make them fluorescent, or the use of algae to produce new varieties of beer.

Another group is transhumanists, who are focused primarily on strengthening and improving the human body, with the ultimate goal of improving the human breed. They are convinced that only by improving themselves and going beyond the initial biological limitations, people will be able to compete with artificial intelligence in the future.

Often, the situation in the field of biohaching reflects the characteristics of society and the culture that develops in it. For example, European biohackers, as a rule, differ from their North American “colleagues.” American groups are engaged in developing alternatives to the established practice of health care. Meanwhile, European biokhakers are more focused on finding ways to help people in poor countries or to participate in various artistic bio-projects.

Swedes viral microchips implanted under their skin 
Thousands Sweden voluntarily implanted microchips in their bodies, which can function as a contactless credit cards, keys and tickets.

Once the chip is under the skin, you no longer need to worry about losing a credit card, or carrying a heavy purse. However, for many people the idea of ​​implanting a microchip in their body seems more like an anti-utopia than an embodied dream.

Some argue that the reason for this recent trend is probably the high level of welfare in Sweden. But in fact, the factors explaining why about 3,500 Swedes made a choice in favor of such microchips are more difficult than one would expect.

This phenomenon reflects the unique situation with biohaching in Sweden. If you look at the problem deeper, the Swedish addiction to any digital gadgets goes much further than these microchips.

The term “biohackers” is used for amateur biologists who conduct experiments in the field of biomedicine, but do so outside traditional institutions such as universities, medical companies and other scientifically-controlled structures. Just like computer hackers crack other people’s servers, biohackers hack biological systems.

Biohakking is also a culture, and diverse, with a multitude of subgroups, each of which has its own range of interests, goals and even ideology. However, for all the diversity, there are two main groups: the branch-hackers and transhumanists.

The first category includes amateur biologists who create laboratory equipment from household utensils. They practice the so-called “lean science”, finding inexpensive solutions that are designed to improve the standard of living of people in developing countries.

However, in addition, they also carry out more frivolous experiments, such as gene modification of plants to make them fluorescent, or the use of algae to produce new varieties of beer.

Another group is transhumanists, who are focused primarily on strengthening and improving the human body, with the ultimate goal of improving the human breed. They are convinced that only by improving themselves and going beyond the initial biological limitations, people will be able to compete with artificial intelligence in the future.

Often, the situation in the field of biohaching reflects the characteristics of society and the culture that develops in it. For example, European biohackers, as a rule, differ from their North American “colleagues.” American groups are engaged in developing alternatives to the established practice of health care. Meanwhile, European biokhakers are more focused on finding ways to help people in poor countries or to participate in various artistic bio-projects.

It should be emphasized that the Swedish culture of biohaching is different from the rest of Europe. Most Swedish bihakers belong to the transhumanist movement. It is the transhumanists, or, more specifically, the subgroup calling themselves “grinders”, insert thousands of Swedes NFC chips replacing credit cards, under the skin between the thumb and forefinger. These are the same microchips that have been used for decades To track animal migration routes or move mail.

So, why are the Swedes so willing to offer their bodies for the implantation of microchips? One of the available theories is that they are more inclined to share personal data, due to the peculiarities of the structure of the national social security system.

However, this myth of the “naive Swede”, which unconditionally trusts the government and national institutions, is an exaggeration, which was even emphasized by the Swedish Foreign Ministry. If this can be considered an explanation, then, of course, not exhaustive.

More convincing is the fact that people in Sweden trust digital technologies very much. Most Swedes are deeply convinced of their positive potential. Over the past two decades, the Swedish government has invested heavily in technology infrastructure – and this has not been left without a trace. The Swedish economy today is heavily based on digital exports, digital services and digital technologies.

Sweden has become one of the most successful countries in the world in the creation and export of digital products. Well-known companies such as Skype and Spyotify were founded in Sweden. Vera in digital technologies and their potential greatly influenced the Swedish culture. And the transhumanist movement is based on this foundation. In fact, Sweden played an important role in shaping a global transhumanist ideology.

The Humanist + World Transhumanist Organization was founded by Swede Nick Bostrom in 1998. Since then, many Swedes have had time to make sure that they should try to improve their biological bodies.

While the whole world is shocked by the number of people who are undergoing microchip implantation in Sweden, we should take the opportunity to penetrate deeper into the essence of the Swedes’ amazing attitude to everything related to digital technologies. After all, this phenomenon is just one of many manifestations of a deep faith in progress that makes Sweden a completely unique country.

sources
http://mixstuff.ru/archives/141721

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