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In the United States, a Boeing 737 engine exploded, splinters hit the salon. The plane was planted by a pilot who served in the Navy

Holiday pictures AP
Holiday pictures AP

Because of the explosion the cabin was depressurized, the plane began to fall sharply

In the United States, flight 1380 of Southwest Airlines from New York to Dallas made an emergency landing at Philadelphia Airport. At Boeing 737-700, about 20 minutes after takeoff, the left engine exploded at an altitude of about 10,000 meters. On board there were 144 passengers and five crew members.

After the explosion of the engine, the fragments broke through the fuselage and smashed the porthole. One of the passengers sitting near the window, wounded and dragged out the window because of the depressurization of the cabin . According to the passengers, they dragged her back to the salon for a few minutes, because of a sharp drop, there were strong pressure drops.

“Well, the flight! Everything turned out all right! We are alive!”

During the landing on the plane there was a strong smell of fire and smoke, but there was no open fire. The pilot made an emergency landing at the airport in Philadelphia: firefighters doused with foam engines and wings Boeing 737-700, passengers were evacuated. According to media reports, one person was killed, about seven were injured by debris, another one suffered a heart attack .

One of the passengers talked about what was happening on board in his facebook

Passenger Marty Martinez (Marty Martinez) published several videos and photos of what was happening aboard the Boeing 737-700 in an emergency landing. He paid for Wi-Fi on board and was one of the first to talk about what was happening , including the loss of a woman in the porthole.

Judging by the publication of Martinez, most of the passengers remained calm and sat in their seats in oxygen masks. Afterwards, some of them shared that the sharp landing lasted about 30 minutes, because of which they managed to pray and mentally bid farewell to relatives.

A hole in the porthole of Boeing 737-700. Photos from the passenger's facebook
A hole in the porthole of Boeing 737-700. Photos from the passenger’s facebook
Landing was successful, at the helm was one of the first female pilots of fighters

As Wired noted , both engine explosion and depressurization are rare, so for pilots the situation was a real test. While the National Transport Safety Council did not disclose details, according to the transcripts of the talks it is known that the pilots remained calm and reported all actions.

According to Gizmodo, one of the pilots was Tammie Jo Shults, she welcomed the passengers at the exit from the plane. In the 80’s, she became one of the first pilots of the Hornet fighter in the US Navy . Together with colleagues, Schultes advocated the expansion of opportunities for women in aviation and actively challenged discrimination in military structures.

Flight pilot 1380 Tammy Joe Schultes (left). Photos of Heavy.com
Flight pilot 1380 Tammy Joe Schultes (left). Photos of Heavy.com

One passenger was killed, which was dragged into the porthole

According to the passengers, the woman, ported in the porthole, was called Jennifer Riordan, she fell out of the plane almost to the waist. Her whole blood was pulled out of the porthole, and several passengers, including the nurse, made her heart massage and artificial respiration for more than 20 minutes .

Soon after the incident, a record of pilot talks appeared on YouTube where one of them could be heard: “We have a gap in the porthole and someone flew there.” Eyewitnesses said that when the passenger was dragged out of the porthole, one of the men plugged him with his back to maintain pressure.

Soon after the landing, the city’s representatives and the Mayor of Albuquerque, where Riordan came from, confirmed her death. As the media found out , she worked at Wells Fargo and helped in the Catholic children’s school, she has two children.

Jennifer Riordan became the first passenger since 2009, who died on board the American airline because of an accident.

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